What Is the character Of Gravity?

What Is the character Of Gravity?

In a science journal, I once read that the last word fate of the Universe was an implosion of the large Crunch. The universe was in peril of collapse, and humanity's chance at survival seemed slim. But then a spark of hope. It seemed that by observing the redshift of distant galaxies scientists had discovered the Universe wasn't imploding but actually, expanding, and therefore the effect was accelerating. Unfortunately, this doesn't guarantee the persistence of humankind. At some point, the sun will dim so will all of the celebs we could also be ready to believe for survival. the sole problem is that technology won't be developed sufficiently to sustain us and span distances even greater than the present distances between celestial bodies. But why is that? Could it's substance, as some scientists believe, or could it's some yet-undiscovered anti-gravity wave pushing the heavens apart? The answer isn’t anti-gravity, but gravity itself. it's an equivalent force that holds us firmly grounded on this earth and causes the universe to expand outward per annum. This doesn’t add up until you understand the true nature of gravity. It is known that gravity is “created” when space-time has got to curve around the mass. Since they're directly behind other massive objects in space, stars that are in space do that because they're directly behind other massive objects in space. Simply put, light from a foreign object travels through space-time and can encounter gravity, and when it does it'll, from our point of view, bend and travel in a new direction. As far because the light was concerned, it traveled during a perfect line. However, why do two objects "want" to return together if space-time is curled? the solution is sort of simple. When two objects are within a particular proximity to at least one another, the separate curvatures of space-time merge into one. The curvature around the two objects would seem elongated when the objects were an outsized distance apart. Whenever two objects are farther apart, the hourglass becomes longer, and therefore the curvature of space-time becomes thinner. With increasing distance between two objects, the hourglass becomes less elongated. Space-time prefers the latter because it reduces the general space-time physical phenomenon that the curvature creates. That may explain the effect gravity has on objects as we've come to understand it, but it doesn’t explain how it also can push objects apart. First, consider a universe that only features a single object in it. we all know that space-time will curve around the object and thus have a particular amount of physical phenomenon to affect. Space prefers a lower state of energy, and since space prefers a lower state of energy, a universe with one mass will expand to scale back the physical phenomenon created by the curving effect we call gravity. And if we add a second mass to the present same universe, but only very far apart, the effect of both masses causing the universe to expand are going to be greater than the effect of gravity pushing the 2 objects together. Because of this, our lonely universe with the 2 masses will expand and everything in it'll get further apart, a bit like our own universe is doing. then there's the ultimate fate of the universe to debate. I feel the universe will neither contract to one point nor expand forever. I feel the universe will spend all the energy contained within and just become a void without mass or energy, it'll become still and without life. even as sad as contracting I assume.

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